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11 beautiful and varied gardens in and around the village of Cliviger were opened to the public in 2015 as part of the National Open Gardens scheme.

Keen gardeners travelled from around the country to visit Burnley’s open gardens and marvelled at the green fingered displays, the stunning scenery and made friends with some delightful garden animals!

We are delighted to feature seven of the wonderful open gardens, which include cottage, riverside, valley and rockery gardens plus a special attraction – a wonderful herd of very friendly alpacas.

Visitors enjoyed acres of well stocked gardens, with roses, ornamental trees, flower borders, shrubs, fruit and vegetable plots, many with extensive views across the surrounding countryside – it’s a great day out and a wonderful way to pick up some top gardening tips too.

Alan Scholes, one of the organisers of the Cliviger Open Gardens day said: “I’m delighted the Burnley Magazine wanted to feature our Open Gardens. I was one of four residents who formed the original steering group after an invitation was extended to the villagers to open their gardens and help with the planning.

“The response was excellent and 11 gardens and 2 allotments were opened to the public.

“The gardens, all varied in size, were lovingly prepared for the Open Day and we were blessed with a fine day. We had no idea what the response would be and we were delighted with the wonderful turnout.

“The hosts and visitors had a great time. A lot of work went into the planning of the day and we are already planning for our 2016 open day, with a provisional date set for Sunday 3rd July,” but keep any eye on the Open Gardens website for an update www.opengardens.co.uk

Come along and enjoy some fabulous hospitality you’ll even be treated to some home baked goodies!

Proceeds raised from admissions to the Open Gardens are donated to the Cliviger Village Hall fund.

More about National Open Gardens

The National Open Gardens Scheme is an initiative where hundreds of private gardens are opened up across Britain to raise money for local worthwhile causes. You can get together with your neighbours to show off your efforts through the Open Gardens National Directory. It was set up a few years ago by two ‘ordinary gardeners’, Kate and Jack Preston, who took part in one of the earliest successful schemes.

They set up the website opengardens.co.uk so that groups in villages and small towns could submit details of their open gardens and their charity free of charge. The scheme has been a huge success with the site receiving over 30,000 visitors, who plan their days out across Britain to enjoy people’s gardens and tea and cakes – all in aid of a good cause.


 

Roadside Rockery Garden

Jean Haycock: “Our garden was used mainly for visitors to get their maps at the start of the open gardens tour, so we just opened our front garden.

“Our garden is quite unusual as it slopes away from the house, and we can’t actually see it from the house but passers-by often compliment us on our rockery layout and plant selection.

“The Open Garden Day, which we helped to organise, attracted visitors from as far as Merseyside, Rochdale and Hull, as well as the closer surrounding area, and the visitors were genuinely appreciative of the warm Burnley welcome they received from the garden owners, not forgetting the delicious afternoon teas we provided!

“It is a great way of bringing new visitors to Burnley, who are always pleasantly surprised about how beautiful the area is.

“We love living here in Burnley and love being within 1 hour of the Yorkshire Dales, the Lake District, the Fylde Coast and Bronte country, in addition to the wonderful scenery around us.”

“We love living here in Burnley and love being within 1 hour of the Yorkshire Dales, the Lake District, the Fylde Coast and Bronte country, in addition to the wonderful scenery around us.


 

Open Plan Garden

Colin Scholes: “We are fortunate to have uninterrupted views from our garden across to the famous Pendle hill, across the northwest towards Cliviger Gorge and to the south east.

“We welcomed visitors from Liverpool and Wigan who enjoyed afternoon tea on our lawn whilst enjoying the stunning views.

“Our small water feature seemed to intrigue Andy, the Burnley Magazine photographer, as he lay on the lawn to get the right angle! We most enjoy our summer house, it has brought much pleasure to us and we often comment ‘if we were on holiday we’d think this was wonderful!’ We are lucky to live in such a lovely area.

“Burnley is big enough to be a vibrant business hub, small enough to be homely and at the heart of the rural Lancashire countryside. Burnley has a little bit of everything!”

Burnley is big enough to be a vibrant business hub, small enough to be homely and at the heart of the rural Lancashire countryside. Burnley has a little bit of everything!


 

Bungalow Garden & thriving allotment

Jim Bradley: “During the spring and summer months my main hobby is the house, garden and my allotment. The allotment is just across the road from the house, which makes it more manageable! I colour up the front of the bungalow and the back garden boarders with annuals, geraniums, fuchsias, petunias, begonias, antirrhinum, and plant lots of tubs, window boxes and hanging baskets.

“Very early in the new year the allotment has to be prepared for the coming growing season. One of the main tasks is to go to the local farmer for well-rotted manure, which is mixed into the soil to help with the vegetable plot. Last year we had a great year with cauliflowers, lettuce, cabbage, peas, beetroot, beans, leeks, and onions in abundance, we’ll see what this year brings.

“The Open Gardens day was a huge success. Myself and my wife Maureen are Burnley through and through, I don’t mind saying I’m 73 and Maureen is 70 (which she might mind me saying!) Our family tree shows we are descendants of weavers and miners from the Hapton Valley pit, and we are proud to represent them and Burnley, as it’s a wonderful place to live.”

Our family tree shows we are descendants of weavers and miners from the Hapton Valley pit, and we are proud to represent them and Burnley, as it’s a wonderful place to live.


Garden, goats & goose

Sandra Pounder: “We started our garden in 2000 when we built our new bungalow. “

We had the site cleared of 10 asbestos garages before we built our gorgeous bungalow.

“Our garden was designed and created by ourselves and we did all the work. I can remember having 40 tons of top soil delivered and starting to move it with a wheelbarrow, only to resort to getting a mechanical machine after moving a few barrows full! But we got there in the end and we’re delighted with the result of our hard work.

“We’ve always had birds and animals, the oldest currently being our 30 year old goose Lucy. The goats are pets who are supposed to eat the grass to save mowing but will eat anything they shouldn’t, but we love them!

“We had a great response from last year’s Open Gardens Day with about 80 visitors coming through on the day. All the visitors commented how beautiful the garden was and recognised all the hard work which had gone into it.

“The visitors commented that they received a fabulous Burnley welcome in all the Burnley gardens, and thought everyone had been so welcoming and friendly – they hoped to see us again in 2016.”

visitors received a fabulous Burnley welcome in all the Burnley gardens


Natural Valley Garden

Raymond Haffner: “We created our valley garden out of farmland. We bought the house 25 years ago when it was a working farm and converted the farm house and land into our home and garden.

“We’ve worked hard over the years to transform the area into our secret valley garden. There’s a lovely stream running through the garden and feedback from the many visitors to the Open Day was very favourable.

“The garden is quite steep and over the years I’ve created several paths and bridges to access and tend to each particular area of the garden. My wife and I are both in our 80s and our garden is quite a labour of love and we were delighted with the feedback from the visitors.”

our garden is quite a labour of love, and we were delighted with the feedback from the visitors


Swinden Rise Alpacas!

This garden was a showstopper! but more about the fun and friendly alpacas and the stunning views than the plant!

Marguerite and Keith Lawson have been rearing Alpacas since 2008. They are a relatively small breeding farm, but they just love alpacas.

Keith Lawson: “Alpacas are lovely animals and a lot of people in the neighbourhood make detours to come and see them. This is why we opened our field to let the people of Cliviger and beyond to get up close to the alpacas and ask us any questions they may have about them.

“It is amazing what kind of questions the public ask and the interest they show.

“Alpacas are quiet and easy to manage, they are not like sheep that need to be rounded up with a dog, they are so inquisitive that they will come up to anyone who is stood in the field.

“Do they spit? Oh yes, mainly at each other, but when it comes to shearing or a visit by the vet then it is best to keep one’s head down or you will be covered in green smelly gunge!

“Alpacas originate from Chile and Peru so our winters are quite mild in comparison. They also recognise one another. Often you get grandma, daughter and grandaughter sat in a group. There is a long wait for the babies which are called cria. The gestation period is 11½ months. They are very civilised when it comes to giving birth, they always have their new cria through the day, so hopefully, no sleepless nights for their owners, how convenient is that?

“We do hope that this has given a little insight into the alpaca world, if you have some land and want to keep them as pets you will have to keep at least two as they are herd animals and would fret on their own.”

Alpacas originate from Chile and Peru so our winters are quite mild in comparison